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There are many different kinds of breast cancer surgery, and the type of surgery you have had will determine whether you need to get mammograms in the future. If you have had breast-conserving surgery, you need to continue to get mammograms.


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Aug 31, 2017 · Getting called back after a screening mammogram is fairly common and doesn’t mean you have breast cancer. In fact, fewer than 1 in 10 women called back for more tests are found to have cancer.


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Houssami N. Overdiagnosis of breast cancer in population screening: does it make breast screening worthless?. Cancer Biol Med. 2017;14(1):1-8.


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If you test positive for an abnormal BRCA1, BRCA2, or PALB2 gene and you’ve never had breast cancer, you now know that your lifetime risk of developing breast cancer is 40-85%, or about 3 to 7 times greater than that of a woman who doesn’t have a mutation.


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Breast Cancer Prevention, Are Mammogram Safe? "Mammograms increase the risk for developing breast cancer and raise the risk of spreading or metastasizing an existing growth." says Dr. Charles B. Simone, a former clinical associate in immunology and pharmacology at the National Cancer


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At first, Sex and the City star Cynthia Nixon was hesitant to reveal that a cancerous tumor had been discovered in her right breast during a routine mammogram.Nixon, best known for playing the responsible Miranda Hobbes, didn't want her condition to become public during her treatment.


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There are several risk factors that increase your chances of getting breast cancer. However, having any of these doesn’t mean you will definitely develop the disease.


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Ms Strachan, who will now undergo reconstructive surgery, hopes her story will inspire others. As an ambassador for the charity Breakthrough Breast Cancer, she is stressing the importance of having regular mammograms.


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Breast cancer — Comprehensive overview covers prevention, symptoms, diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer.


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The Best Breast Cancer Screening Tests. 5 More Reasons Not to Get a Mammogram. by Christiane Northrup, M.D.